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Posts for tag: gum disease

By Lynch Dental Center
July 25, 2021
Category: Oral Health
Tags: gum disease  
SmokersAreMoreSusceptibletoHarmfulGumDiseaseHeresWhy

Along with tooth decay, periodontal (gum) disease is a primary enemy of oral health. If not caught and treated, a gum infection could spread and eventually cause tooth loss.

But although prevalent among the general population, one demographic in particular is highly susceptible to gum disease—smokers and tobacco users in general. It's estimated over 60 percent of all smokers will contend with a gum infection at some point during their lifetimes. Smokers are also twice as likely as non-smokers to develop advanced gum disease that could lead to serious dental damage.

The high rate of gum disease among smokers (and to some extent, all tobacco users) is connected to the effect that tobacco has on oral health in general. Studies show that nicotine constricts blood vessels in the mouth, which in turn reduces their delivery of antibodies to fight disease-causing bacteria. As a result, smokers have more harmful bacteria in their mouths than non-smokers, which increases their risk of dental disease.

Smokers are also less likely than non-smokers to display inflammation or redness, the initial signs of a burgeoning gum infection. This too has to do with the constricted blood vessels in the gums that can't deliver adequate oxygen and nutrients to these tissues. As a result, the gums can appear pink and healthy, yet still be infected. This could delay diagnosis of gum disease, allowing the infection to become more advanced.

Finally, smoking can interfere with the treatment of gum disease. Because of nicotine, a tobacco users' infections and wounds are often slower to heal. Combined with late diagnoses of gum disease, this slower healing creates an environment where smokers are three times more likely than non-smokers to lose teeth from gum disease.

If you do smoke, it's important to let your dentist know how much and for how long you've smoked, which could be relevant to any dental care or treatment. Better yet, quitting the habit could improve your oral health and lower your risk for teeth-destroying gum disease.

If you would like more information on the effects of smoking on oral health, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Smoking and Gum Disease.”

By Lynch Dental Center
July 15, 2021
Category: Oral Health
Tags: gum disease  
GumDiseaseCouldbeMakingOtherDiseasesWorse

Half of adults over age 30, and an astounding 70% over 65, have had some form of periodontal (gum) disease. Unchecked, a bacterial gum infection can spread into the supporting bone and destroy attachments between the teeth and gums. Because of its rapidity and aggressiveness, gum disease is the number one cause of tooth loss among adults.

But there may be even more harm caused by gum disease beyond losing teeth: There's growing evidence gum disease may worsen other diseases like diabetes, heart disease or rheumatoid arthritis. Patients with gum disease are also more likely to suffer from one or more of these systemic conditions.

The link between gum disease and these other diseases appears to be inflammation. When tissue becomes injured or diseased, swelling (inflammation) occurs to isolate these tissues from the rest of the body. Under normal circumstances, this is a critical defense mechanism to protect the body overall.

But this response is a temporary measure—if it becomes chronic, it can actually damage the tissues it's trying to protect. This often happens with gum disease as inflammation can't overcome the gum infection, and both sides settle into a kind of trench warfare. The same story plays out with other diseases with an inflammatory response. And if the body is waging war with a gum infection, it can worsen these other conditions.

It's important then to take care of your gums and the rest of the body to minimize chronic inflammation. You can help prevent a gum infection by brushing and flossing every day and getting your teeth cleaned professionally at least every six months. You should also see your dentist if you notice swollen, reddened or bleeding gums, often the first signs of gum disease.

It can also benefit your gums if you're addressing other inflammatory issues in your body. Besides regular medical care, you can reduce your risk for other systemic diseases by eating a healthy diet, keeping your weight at an optimum level and avoiding smoking.

The individual parts of your body aren't isolated islands: Diseases that affect one can eventually affect all. By preventing or treating gum disease as early as possible, you'll also help reduce the effects of other systemic diseases.

If you would like more information on preventing gum disease, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation.

By Lynch Dental Center
February 05, 2021
Category: Oral Health
Tags: gum disease  
LoveYourHeartLoveYourGums

This month there are hearts everywhere we look, so it's fitting that February is designated as American Heart Month. We join with the American Heart Association in the goal of spreading awareness of cardiovascular disease, the top cause of death around the world. And while we think about our heart health, let's talk about the connection between cardiovascular health and oral health.

Cardiovascular disease includes heart disease, high blood pressure and cerebrovascular disease (involving the blood vessels of the brain)—in short, diseases of the circulatory system that can lead to heart attacks and strokes. Periodontal disease, in contrast, attacks the gums and other tissues that hold the teeth in place. The two conditions, however, have more in common than you might think.

Both periodontal (gum) disease and cardiovascular disease are chronic and progressive, and both are linked to inflammation. Periodontal disease and cardiovascular disease share certain inflammation markers detected in the blood that can damage blood vessels. Furthermore, specific types of oral bacteria associated with periodontal disease have been found in plaque that builds up inside of blood vessels, constricting blood flow.

People with gum disease are twice as likely to have cardiovascular disease, and studies show that having advanced gum disease worsens existing heart conditions, increases the chances of having a stroke, and raises the risk of having a first heart attack by 28%. Untreated gum disease also makes hypertension (known as “the silent killer”) worse.

However, here's some encouraging news: Intensive treatment for gum disease was shown to result in significantly lower blood pressure. So, as you think about what you can do to take care of your heart health and overall health, don't forget your gums. Here are some tips:

Maintain a dedicated oral hygiene routine. A daily oral hygiene habit that includes brushing twice a day and flossing once a day is the best thing you can do to ward off gum disease.

Visit our office for regular dental checkups. Regular dental cleanings and checkups can keep you in the best oral health. Even with daily brushing and flossing, professional cleanings are needed to remove plaque and tartar from places a toothbrush can't reach, and regular checkups allow us to detect developing problems early.

Eat for good overall health. People who consume less sugar tend to have healthier teeth and gums as well as better overall health. An “anti-inflammatory diet” that is low in sugar and other refined carbohydrates and rich in whole grains, fiber and healthy fats can reduce inflammation throughout your body—and has been shown to greatly improve gum disease.

As a former Surgeon General once wrote, “You can't have general health without oral health.” So celebrate this month of hearts by showing love to your heart and your gums.

If you have questions about how to maintain good oral health, call us or schedule a consultation. You can learn more in the Dear Doctor magazine article “Good Oral Health Leads to Better Health Overall.”

By Lynch Dental Center
July 07, 2020
Category: Oral Health
Tags: gum disease  

Plain and simple, gum disease causes tooth loss. Also, it harms your systemic health. At Lynch Dental Center in River Forest and Chicago IL, your dentists, Drs. John, Sheila, and Frances Lynch work with their patients to prevent this prevalent oral health problem. Your smile can thrive for life! Just talk to your River Forest dentist today!

What is gum disease?

Also called periodontal disease, gum disease is a chronic oral health problem affecting the soft tissues which support and nourishes your teeth and bone structure. Healthy gums are pink and resemble the collar on a turtleneck sweater. They have surrounding pockets, or sulci, which measure one to three millimeters when healthy.

When plaque, tartar, and their associated Strep bacteria overrun these pockets, people develop gum disease. It varies in intensity from mild gingivitis to advanced periodontitis which causes tooth loss, destruction of the jaw bone, and systemic health problems such as diabetes, heart disease, stroke, dementia, and hypertension.

What are the symptoms of gum disease?

In its earlier stages, gum disease has few noticeable symptoms. It's one of the many reasons your biannual appointments at River Forest dentist are so important. However, as it progresses--and it will worsen if untreated--periodontal disease exhibits:

  • Bleeding, swollen, red, and tender gum tissue
  • Pus underneath the gums
  • Bad breath
  • Loose teeth which begin to develop gaps
  • Pain upon biting and chewing
  • Mouth sores
  • Badly fitting dentures
  • Changing dental bite
  • Receded gum tissue
  • Gum pockets deeper than three millimeters as measured on the exam by your hygienist or dentist in their River Forest or Chicago IL office

How can I prevent it?

Yes, you can prevent gum disease by limiting risk factors such as alcohol consumption and smoking. Also, you can increase your intake of water and high-fiber dietary choices. Your River Forest dentist wants all their patients to receive in-office exams and cleanings every six months to watch for signs of gum disease and to remove plaque and tartar.

And, of course, your best tools in preventing or managing gum disease are twice a day brushing and once-daily flossing. These practices are very valuable in the war against gum disease, decay, and tooth loss, says the American Academy of Periodontology.

For people with gum problems, Lynch Dental Center offers a wide array of treatment options, including:

  • Deep cleanings and root planing
  • Instillation of antibiotics below the gum line
  • Laser gum therapy
  • Gum tissue grafting

Know all you can

At Lynch Dental Center in River Forest and Chicago IL, dentists Dr. John Lynch, Dr. Sheila Lynch, and Dr. Frances Lynch are all about prevention and education. To stay on top of your gum health, ask their advice on ways to prevent this oral health issue. Call us to arrange your routine cleaning and exam today: (312) 263-3235 for our Chicago office, (708) 366-6411 for our River Forest IL office.

By Lynch Dental Center
April 01, 2020
Category: Dental Procedures
Tags: gum disease  
YoumayneedaPeriodontisttoFullyTreatYourGumDisease

In the fight against dental disease and other conditions your general dentist is your first line of defense for prevention strategies and treatment. Sometimes, however, your condition may require the services of a dental specialist to restore health to your mouth.

A good example of this is an advanced case of periodontal (gum) disease. While your dentist and hygienist are quite skilled at removing plaque and calculus, there may be extenuating circumstances that may benefit from the knowledge and expertise of a specialist. In the case of gum-related issues that would be a periodontist, a dentist who specializes in the diagnosis and treatment of diseases or disorders related to the gums and bone that support teeth.

There are a number of reasons why you may be referred to a periodontist regarding your gum health. Besides advanced stages of the disease (loose teeth, periodontal pocketing or bone loss) that require surgery or other invasive techniques you may have a particular form that requires advanced treatment, or a secondary condition, like pregnancy or diabetes, which could impact your periodontal condition. There may also be a need for a periodontist’s consultation if you’re preparing for cosmetic restoration, most notably dental implants, that could have a bearing on your gum and bone health.

As your primary oral health “gatekeeper,” your general dentist is largely responsible for determining what you need to achieve optimal health. Likewise, your periodontist or other specialists for other problems will be equally committed to providing you the right care for your situation. Your general dentist and other specialists will work together to ensure that your condition will be cared for, and that you’ll continue to enjoy the highest level of oral health possible.

If you would like more information on the role of periodontics and other dental specialties in oral health, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Referral to a Dental Specialist.”